Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Top 3 Wednesday | Contemporary Classics by Women

Hey, all.

Every Wednesday, I'm bringing you a new feature post on my blog - "Top 3 Wednesday." I'll compile a list of suggestions or books related to a theme, and I'd love to hear your responses too! If you have any thoughts as to lists that I can make, please let me know and as always, happy reading.


Today I'm bringing you three classic titles written by women. Don't worry, I won't be including Pride and Prejudice in this list... but as always, you should read it.

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

"Acclaimed by critics, beloved by readers of all ages, taught everywhere from inner-city grade schools to universities across the country, and translated all over the world, The House on Mango Street is the remarkable story of Esperanza Cordero. 

Told in a series of vignettes – sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous – it is the story of a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become. Few other books in our time have touched so many readers."

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

"When Janie, at sixteen, is caught kissing shiftless Johnny Taylor, her grandmother swiftly marries her off to an old man with sixty acres. Janie endures two stifling marriages before meeting the man of her dreams, who offers not diamonds, but a packet of flowering seeds ..."

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

"The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior—to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature."

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